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Do cloud service providers scare you?

In this podcast, Dyn's Mike Kane talks about his ideas for how reluctant businesses can get more comfortable with cloud service providers.

With cloud technology now mainstream, enterprises are using it as a foundation for their planning and marketing efforts. Even so, they still have concerns about cloud security, vendor lock-in and loss of control with an infrastructure that is no longer down the hall in an on-premises data center. SearchCloudApplications spoke with Mike Kane, a senior product manager for performance assurance at Dyn, a cloud-based Internet performance company in Manchester, N.H. He noted that many IT departments started in cloud computing by putting their faith into a single cloud service provider.

Today, that has given rise to the fear of vendor lock-in, driving the desire to break out of that box.

Kane explained that with proper policy control, it's now possible to distribute assets among multiple clouds or data center locations. "Having context gives you choice based on a business issue or technical issue that will allow you to use the right resource at the right time," Kane said. It also opens the door for a tiered user model in which customers willing to pay for faster response times can interact with higher-powered network and server resources.

A crucial concern is that when companies sign with a cloud service provider, they often have no say in the network service providers used or communications paths that are taken around the globe. Those paths could go through Eastern Europe, which an enterprise might find less than appealing, primarily due to security concerns. Kane calls this "the dirty little secret of cloud service providers." Cloud providers, he explained, have multiple locations and work to get your assets as close to your customers as possible. But, as the business grows and develops customers in other regions, cloud performance would likely benefit from a redistribution of assets and an increase in server locations. This scenario also is advantageous because it provides backup and load balancing. A cloud service provider should be able to provide multilocation, backup and load balancing for an existing customer without additional cost, Kane said.

Next Steps

Five things to consider when choosing cloud service providers

How to work securely with cloud service providers

How to detect cloud vendor lock-in before it's too late

This was last published in August 2015

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How did you overcome your jitters over choosing a cloud service provider?
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Not only jitter but security. The cloud service can be create in everywhere so we need know where the cloud service is hosting. I support that enterprises must be visit this places always they can, search and compare several options. Other advive, this a important issue to resolve for only one person.
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I agree, for both the sake of performance and security, it's important to know where your software is hosted AND the path that used to get to those particular servers. The path might be long, with many hops that breed inefficiency. Those paths might also go through geographies that might be lax or willfully neglectful about security.
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Not to mention, geographies and governments that claim control over your data, regardless of where your company is located. 
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